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Fynbos in the rain

Posted by on 5:12 pm in The Green Life | 0 comments

Fynbos in the rain

Winter brings replenishing water, icy winds and seasonal flowers. A frosty magic moment revealed some interesting aspects as I passed this scene. (more…)

Aliens

Posted by on 7:14 pm in The Green Life | 0 comments

Aliens

Aliens, a term that evokes wonder, disbelief and scepticism, yet well accepted parlance. In the gardening world, especially here where our Fynbos heritage has been cornered but not subdued, aliens are active.
A misnomer which refers to vigorous exotics which are advantageously colonising the region, taking up water and land.
The photograph illustrates rapid germination post fire, sans any local flora. Fortunately they provide good mulch and firewood and in a time of deforestation perhaps Gaia is setting the balance with fast growing trees in otherwise ‘barren’ areas.

Fire and water

Posted by on 7:05 pm in Worm Farm | 0 comments

Fire and water

Fire and water, elements in creation and destruction, all too evident in this picture. This large plastic water tank was superheated in a devastating fire on an adjacent farm. Two tanks, side by side both melted and malformed down to the level of the water within. After the fire had roared past and all danger abated we rescued these valuable sculptures and brought them to the worm farm to conserve water for our vegetable garden.
Definitely a case of recycle, re-use, the effort will be worth it. As were our smiles and laughter moving them to their final destination.

Adaminspection

Posted by on 4:24 pm in The Green Life | 0 comments

Adaminspection

Majesty,marvelous mountain.The earthworm team are taking in the beauty of the gnarled, colourful rocks and the pristine water, The reflections and echoes were startlingly crisp and clear.
The reward for hard work was a walk up to Three Dams cradled in kloof. Our gardening water originates from this catchment, live energised water. How blessed.
To the uninitiated and frequent visitor alike these are reservoirs of beauty.

Workers

Posted by on 6:33 pm in The Green Life, Worm Farm | 0 comments

Workers

One of the advantages of an earthworm farm is that the workers(worms) work 24/7. Their slower periods, in a system open to the weather, are temperature related as they don’t differentiate between day and night.
It follows then that after the worms have been well fed, chores and gardening done, the workers can rest and take in sunny success.

Transplanting

Posted by on 7:52 pm in Landscaping | 0 comments

Transplanting

Choosing a day to transplant trees is certainly a challenging task, moving a tree is critical.
A client required clearing of access to a garage which brought me to this situation. Optimum transplanting on the dark moon was past yet we are still enjoying winter moisture and dormancy. Our diarised day broke cold, windy and wet.
We proceeded to root prune, clip off leaves,to reduce shock and dig a new home. Without too much fuss, the team is well drilled, we transplanted a water pear and a yellowwood new sites. Compost, regular watering and TLC should see them settle and show new growth in the summer.
Hopefully the owner of the adjacent plot chooses to keep access away from the trees.

compost

Posted by on 2:54 pm in Landscaping | 0 comments

compost

Even in the shivery cold cape weather, work continues. The team are dressing the agapanthas with compost, food for the spring growth and hopefully a stunning display of purple flowers.
Last year a scourge in the form of a burrowing grub knocked the plants hard as it travelled to the centre.
Fortunately no sign this year as the beast was unable to complete its breeding cycle. They arrived here in a batch of hybrid plants from a distant region.
We are looking forward to a colourful season.

Reflections

Posted by on 2:40 pm in Landscaping | 0 comments

Reflections

An exquisite calm day provided Earthworm Organics with a moment to reflect on the merits of a landscaped garden.
We are presently working around this pond/dam, integrating the banks with the surrounding garden.
This opportunity arose after the dominant reeds were reduced and fresh ground exposed. Fortunately we have an abundance of kniphofia, cyperus and wachendorfia to split and replant. We will also plant dietes and groundcovers to bulk out and protect the soil in conjunction with mulch.
Random rocks and pebbles will add texture and form.
How lucky we are to have such grand trees to cast their magnificent shadows in the water.

Earthworm Team

Posted by on 9:43 pm in Landscaping | 0 comments

Earthworm Team

October 2010 Earthworm Organics has acquired  brightly coloured bibs

with our logo and website advertised. We have been growing as a team and now have several gardens to nurture in Hermanus and Stanford. We are using vermicast and leachate as part of our work. I fertilise with leachate and use vermicast as a soil conditioner.

We are also landscaping and use vermicompost as an addition in our plantings. in all work we mulch with recycled garden waste, chipped waste or commercial mulches. The result is healthy gardens!

I plan to build up a portfolio of current and past projects soon.Alois, Suboniso, Feziwe,,Noluvuyo,Elizabeth, Douglas, Donald[reclining]

Earthworm Beads

Posted by on 2:28 pm in Uncategorized | 1 comment

Earthworm Beads

Earthworm Beads.

I have hopefully got your interest with these bright red {old} baubles. They originally decorated my craft stall during the festive season, were many more.These are the survivors from 1994. Plastic sure hangs around for a while, even when it has spent 16 yrs. in a compost system!

The beads entered my compost heaps by accident about the same time that I introduced red wrigglers, coincidentally the same colours.The earthworms were needed to boost the composting process in order to speed up the formation of humus and to reduce my dependency on thermophyllic bacteria which require the constant stimulation of the heap, to keep it warm/hot.Much labour needed.

The beads were noticed when I was seiving the¬† compost, wanted to keep as many worms as possible and remove stones etc. I was about to ‘throw them away’ when I realised that I should keep them and my seivings for the continued culture of the next heap. This action I cognised as fundamental to the organic process:

1 waste is a state of mind.we can re-use “waste’ which I regard as surplus.

2 always return to the system, conciously.

So the beads have become a reminder to me that my earthworm culture is now generations old!